Member Profile: Tetra Images

New in 2017, we will be highlighting various DMLA members to give insight into their businesses with Member Profiles.  First up in the series is Valerie Saunders, President of Tetra Images.  We recently sat down with her for a look at this RF collection with a conceptual concept focus.  You can read the entire interview here.

Member Profile: Interview with Valerie Saunders: Tetra Images

 

Riley Cardoza, DMLA Social Media Assistant, sat down recently with Valerie Saunders, President of Tetra Images to gain some insight into this DMLA member.

  1. Can you describe your experience in the industry?

I started out on the editorial side right after I graduated from college as a photo researcher and then photo editor for magazines at Conde Nast and Gruner & Jahr, among others. I worked with some of the top fashion and beauty photographers of the 1990s and had my first taste of conceptualizing imagery to go alongside headlines and stories. I was surrounded by interesting creative and later became curious about the commercial side of the business. I interviewed at advertising agencies and stock photo agencies and was offered a creative director position at Comstock (a brand that was eventually bought by Getty Images). I was there for six years and tasked with developing their royalty free offering from scratch. I absolutely loved strategizing the content map for that product and working with photographers to produce it all. I learned a great deal about the demand for stock and the very different approach required as compared with my editorial roots. With the advent of the internet and digital photography, the business transformed quickly and I made a decision to leave Comstock and to begin producing content with photographers to market through multiple channels such as Corbis and Getty. Eventually, this evolved into a partnership to launch Tetra Images in 2004.

  1. What is Tetra Images?

Tetra Images is royalty-free imagery produced by leading professional photographers based all around the world. It is art directed and edited by top industry professionals, ruthlessly curated, and distributed through every major global licensing channel. We produce conceptual content across all subject categories and have been a top-selling brand for almost 12 years.

  1. Where do you see Tetra in the next few years?

We are making a big push to bring on photographers who are in more remote locations and who cover different niches. We want content that resounds with every possible territory and to keep energizing the collection with fresh perspectives. The speed of technology is creating a bunch of new opportunities and new audiences for our work. A huge part of my team’s strategy is to cultivate our current and prospective relationships so that we are always putting our pictures at the forefront of these new opportunities.

As the massive volume of imagery continues to crowd the search process, I also see our commitment to curation being a very important part of our service to our licensing clients. As an industry, we need to find ways to make that search process more efficient. No one wants to wade through pages and pages to find something (or nothing). They should be inspired and
excited with every click.

  1. How have your anthropology and economic degrees influenced your work?

Anthropology is the study of culture. In royalty free creative content, especially, you need to speak to a broad audience. A photograph needs to be exceptional enough to get your attention and it needs to be a fast “read” so that the viewer understands the message or the emotion immediately. Certainly a lot of the lifestyle material that we create and represent is at its best when it reflects modern culture in an authentic way. It helps enormously to be interested in what the human experience is, what is trending and how our daily lives are changing all the time. That informs our creative direction so that the imagery is relevant and relatable.

As far as economics, what I love about this business is that you get direct feedback from your buyers as to whether what you are doing is working. If you’re creating the right content, you’re making money. If you’re not delivering the right solutions, you’re out of business. It’s
straight math.

  1. What do you know now that you wish you knew when you started?

Don’t get too caught up in your intuition and hunches. It’s all about the data. Never take your eye off the sales and what clients are responding to. There are a lot of collections out there right now that are busy picking pictures based on their editors’ taste and what they personally like. I have seen this type of “curation” many times over the years and it does not work long-term. A disciplined strategy based on real data and numbers is a far superior predictor of success. This is where the economics kicks in.

  1. How long have you been a DMLA member?

Tetra has been a member of DMLA since our very beginnings in 2006. PACA and DMLA have given me an amazing resource for connecting with other businesses like ours to share information and support each other as the industry continues to grow and transform. The conferences in particular bring the content creators and distributors in one place from around the world and serve up an energized space for exploring opportunities. I have signed many contracts at these events over the years and met some of my very favorite people through DMLA. I consider it an absolutely essential piece for any media licensing business. Onward we go.

 

 

 

 

 

Gado Images Highlights African American History


Gado Images is a San Francisco based company that works with archives worldwide to help them digitize and monetize their visual history. In celebration of Black History Month, Gado Images’ research staff handpicked some of our best archival and contemporary editorial content providing extensive coverage of African American History topics. Our images cover topics ranging from pre-history through slavery and the Civil War, into the civil rights movement, African-American artists and entertainers of the 20th century, all the way up to modern movements like Black Lives Matter.  Read the entire article here.

Gado Images Highlights African American History Images for Black History Month

 

 

 

Gado Images is a San Francisco based company that works with archives worldwide to help them digitize and monetize their visual history. Our partner collections include Johns Hopkins University, the Afro American Newspapers, Silicon Valley Historical Association, and Stuart Lutz Historic Documents. Through partnerships with leading media organizations including Getty Images, Alamy, and Universal Images Group, we distribute our archives’ content to twenty-plus marketplaces around the world.

In celebration of Black History Month, Gado Images’ research staff handpicked some of our best archival and contemporary editorial content providing extensive coverage of African American History topics. Our images cover topics ranging from pre-history through slavery and the Civil War, into the civil rights movement, African-American artists and entertainers of the 20th century, all the way up to modern movements like Black Lives Matter.

The images come from some of the top African American History archives worldwide. Specific collections include more than 11,000 images from the Afro American Newspapers, as well as more than 600 portraits of African-American life at the turn of the century from Johns Hopkins University, entertainment images from the Clarence Gatson collection, and a variety of materials from our Smith Collection. We also have a small but important collection of footage documenting African-American life since the 1950s.

Gado Images has gathered a unique gallery inspired by the recent film Hidden Figures, documenting African Americans in STEM fields, from George Washington Carver to the present day. You can see all our images of African-Americans in STEM fields here: http://www.gettyimages.com/collaboration/boards/VP1n3olOvUuaToD6HGu0Pw

In addition to our African American History content, Gado Images has unique materials from a variety of partners, as well as our own archive in San Francisco. Our collections have strong coverage of science, medicine and technology, 20th century Americana, and the Vietnam War. Our staff is available to field research requests, and we can generally turn around requests in as little as 24 hours. If we don’t have a particular artifact in one of our collections, we can often even acquire the artifact for a request, digitize it at our lab in San Francisco, and have imagery available within one week. All of our research services are free of charge.

 

For specific research requests for Black History Month and beyond, please don’t hesitate to contact us at info@gadoimages.com.

To receive the latest archival and contemporary editorial content from Gado Images, please sign up for From Our Archives newsletter – http://eepurl.com/cw1caz.

To learn more about Gado Images and partnering opportunities, visit www.gadoimages.com.

 

 

DMLA OPPOSES MARYLAND COPYRIGHT DEMAND LETTER BILL

On January 25, 2017 Nancy Wolff, along with representatives from Getty Images, the Copyright Alliance, MPAA, Comcast, BMI Music and others representing creators and owners of content, testified at a hearing against bill HR65 before the Maryland State Senate Finance Committee.

The Bill was trying to regulate copyright demand letters by preventing copyright owners from “making certain assertions of copyright infringement in bad faith”.  It also stipulated that a court might consider, among other factors, the absence of a certificate of copyright registration accompanying the letter s evidence of bad faith.  Read the entire story here.

 

 

DMLA Oppose MD State Law to Regulate Copyright Demand Letter

by Nancy Wolff, DMLA Legal Counsel

Sending copyright demand letters to users of images where no license is apparent has been a common practice of many DMLA members, even before images were distributed digitally. These demand letter s have been part of the copyright boot camp and form letters available to members to contact users and educate them about copyright misuse and to seek compensation if the images are not licensed.

On January 11, Maryland State Senator Edward Reilly (R) introduced a bill, HR 65 before the state legislature to regulate copyright demand letters. The bill is aimed at preventing copyright owners from “making certain assertions of copyright infringement in bad faith” and stipulates that a court may consider, among other factors, the absence of a certificate of copyright registration accompanying the letter as evidence of bad faith. The proposed remedies include the possibility of courts costs, attorney’s fees, and treble damages, including fees up to $50,000. On January 25, 2017 the Maryland State Senate Finance Committee held hearing on the bill. DMLA; Getty Images, the Copyright Alliance, MPAA, Comcast, BMI Music and other s representing creators and owners of content testified at the hearing as to the problems and burdens imposed by such a bill and provided written opposition. A copy of DMLA’s letter to the finance committee opposing the bill is [here]. The associations representing all the visual artists unanimously joined in the opposition as it would subject all copyright owner to unfair burdens in seeking compensation for infringements and violate federal copyright law. Joining our letter were the Society of Media Photographers (ASMP), National Press Photographers Association (NPPA), Professional Photographers of America (PPA), North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA), American Photographic Artists (APA), the Graphic Artist Guild (GAG) and Shaftel & Schmelzer.

Last week we learned that the Maryland Senate Finance Committee was not going to vote on the bill and as to not embarrass the member of the Finance Committee who had introduced the bill. Thanks to the Copyright Alliance for alerting us to so promptly so we could respond so quickly and for Getty Images for attending and speaking directly with Senator Reilly before the hearing. The entire content community mobilized to avoid a very problematic state bill. We will need to stay alert for other state legislatures who may feel the need to protect their citizens if complaints arise over copyright enforcement. Copyright is very different from patents and there is a push to stem what is known as patent trolling. We need to avoid being swept into the same category of bad actors. . The underlying cause in this bill seemed to be a lack of understanding as how images are licensed and the value of a rights managed image.

Response to Copyright Office on Group Registration of Photographs

DMLA together with various other visual arts associations (what we are loosely referring to a Coalition of Visual Artists –DMLA, APA, ASMP, GAG, NPPA, NANPA, and PPA) filed a joint response to a proposed rulemaking by the Copyright Office on Group Registration of Photographs.

The proposal seeks to establish new online registration procedures for groups of unpublished as well as published photographs. The proposal was quite in-depth, including an extensive history of group registration of photographs regulations and the requirements for a new proposed system. In general the coalition was in favor of improving the electronic registration process for registration of all photographs, but had some recommendations for the Copyright Office on as to how to improve the proposed system. Read more here.

GROUP REGISTRATION OF PHOTOGRAPHS

DMLA together with various other visual arts associations (what we are loosely referring to a Coalition of Visual Artists –DMLA, APA, ASMP, GAG, NPPA, NANPA, and PPA) filed a joint response to a proposed rulemaking by the Copyright Office on Group Registration of Photographs.

The proposal seeks to establish new online registration procedures for groups of unpublished as well as published photographs. The proposal was quite in-depth, including an extensive history of group registration of photographs regulations and the requirements for a new proposed system. In general the coalition was in favor of improving the electronic registration process for registration of all photographs, but had some recommendations for the Copyright Office on as to how to improve the proposed system.

Universally, everyone agreed that the arbitrary limitation of 750 images per registration would be burdensome to visual artists and would discourage registration. This limit would be unworkable for many photographers who register all the works in an assignment in one application, and is much lower than the number of images submitted by many members of DMLA when submitting database registration of images uploaded to websites. In addition, the Copyright Office proposal specifically would discourage this database registration in favor of the group registration of unpublished and published photographs regimes. Database registrations were specifically crafted by the Copyright Office at the request of DMLA to assist DMLA members register photographs on behalf of contributors before ingesting them into their database for licensing on the web based platforms. The DMLA’s legal committee, and in particular Dan Pollack, Masterfile’s attorney assisted in responding to that aspect of the proposed rulemaking and expressed DMLA’s concern as this registration has been a key factor in many successful enforcement programs to deter infringements and encourage licensing.

The Coalition also urged that the provision to permit group registration of unpublished photographs and published photographs be expanded to include all forms of visual art, regardless of format, whether photographs, illustration or otherwise.

Other recommendations related to improving the application process to be compatible with typical visual artists’ workflows and promoting the use of APIs that may be developed to allow the seamless registration of photographs and visual artworks, and that both published and unpublished photographs can be registered at the same time.

The joint response was a result of corporation of all the associations and was quite extensive. A copy of the full response can be found here (you’ll have to scroll down to Amicus Briefs and Notices of Inquiries). This is a great example of the joint efforts of the various visual art association coming together with one voice. The Copyright Alliance also adopted the position set out in the coalition of visual artists’ response to the proposed rulemaking as well.

Coalition of Visual Artists Respond to House Judiciary Committee on U.S. Copyright Office Reform

On January 30, 2017 DMLA Digital Media Licensing Association) joined with the other members of a Coalition of Visual Artists (APA, ASMP, GAG, NPPA, NANPA, and PPA) in a joint response to the House Judiciary Committee with comments to the first proposal by Chairman Goodlatte and Ranking Member Conyers “Reform of the U.S. Copyright Office.”

After months of hard work to reach consensus and a united voice, our comments, entitled “Creating a USCO Capable of Succeeding in A Changing World”, begins “Collectively, all members of the signatory associations depend on effective copyright protection and enforcement for their livelihood.”

Read all about it here with a link to the full comments.